Coffee is grown in over eighty distinct regions in the tropical areas of the world. Different climate, soil types, elevation and horticultural, picking, processing, and roasting methods contribute to the distinct coffee flavors associated with each region.  The top ten coffee producing countries in the world in 2008 in order are Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Indonesia, Ethiopia, Mexico, India, Peru, Guatemala, and Honduras with the majority of all coffee growing countries being located within one thousand miles of the Earth’s equator.

Over 25 million people are employed world-wide in the coffee industry with an estimated 400 billion cups consumed annually.   Next to oil, coffee is the second largest global- commodity, with approximately 140 60 kg bags produced in 2008. The United States is cited as the largest consumer of coffee in the world, importing over four billion dollars worth of coffee annually in recent years.  Over 50% of the U.S. population drinks coffee with average daily consumption totaling over 400,000,000 cups.

There are two major types of coffee beans used for the beverage we know and love: Coffea Arabica and Coffea Canphora known as Arabica and Robusta respectively. The Arabicas are grown at higher elevations, optimally between 900 meters (3000 feet) and 2000 meters (6500 feet), and as high as 2700 meters (9000 feet), and are generally more carefully tended than the Robustas.   It takes four to five years for the Arabica trees to produce their first harvest and they will continue to produce for another fifteen to twenty years. The Arabica berries are often hand-picked at the optimum ripeness for each berry.   They produce the finer grades of coffees enjoyed by the discerning coffee drinker.

Because higher altitudes tend to be sparser in rainfall, cooler in temperatures, and lower in oxygen, the Arabica coffee plants grown in these areas take much longer to develop.  The beans mature much more gradually and the resulting flavors in turn are much richer, deep bodied, well balanced, and aromatic.  Although the growing conditions are often very rugged in these altitudes, the beans, though less abundant in quantity, are prized for their superior quality, and hence are more expensive.

The Robustas are a hardier tree and can be grown at much lower elevations, generally between sea level and 3000 feet. They are often machine harvested with the trees producing their first crop within two to three years. They produce a coffee with a harsher and stronger flavor, as well as a higher caffeine content. The Robustas are valuable in blends, and are used in solubles and extracts to provide a strong flavor punch for flavoring food products. They are also much more affordable than the Arabicas, although the Arabicas still constitute approximately 75- 80% of all coffee grown in the world.

Coffee is grown in over eighty distinct regions in the tropical areas of the world. Different climate, soil types, elevation and horticultural, picking, processing, and roasting methods contribute to the distinct coffee flavors associated with each region.  The top ten coffee producing countries in the world in 2008 in order are Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Indonesia, Ethiopia, Mexico, India, Peru, Guatemala, and Honduras with the majority of all coffee growing countries being located within one thousand miles of the Earth’s equator.
Over 25 million people are employed world-wide in the coffee industry with an estimated 400 billion cups consumed annually.   Next to oil, coffee is the second largest global- commodity, with approximately 140 60 kg bags produced in 2008. The United States is cited as the largest consumer of coffee in the world, importing over four billion dollars worth of coffee annually in recent years.  Over 50% of the U.S. population drinks coffee with average daily consumption totaling over 400,000,000 cups.
There are two major types of coffee beans used for the beverage we know and love: Coffea Arabica and Coffea Canphora known as Arabica and Robusta respectively. The Arabicas are grown at higher elevations, optimally between 900 meters (3000 feet) and 2000 meters (6500 feet), and as high as 2700 meters (9000 feet), and are generally more carefully tended than the Robustas.   It takes four to five years for the Arabica trees to produce their first harvest and they will continue to produce for another fifteen to twenty years. The Arabica berries are often hand-picked at the optimum ripeness for each berry.   They produce the finer grades of coffees enjoyed by the discerning coffee drinker.
Because higher altitudes tend to be sparser in rainfall, cooler in temperatures, and lower in oxygen, the Arabica coffee plants grown in these areas take much longer to develop.  The beans mature much more gradually and the resulting flavors in turn are much richer, deep bodied, well balanced, and aromatic.  Although the growing conditions are often very rugged in these altitudes, the beans, though less abundant in quantity, are prized for their superior quality, and hence are more expensive.
The Robustas are a hardier tree and can be grown at much lower elevations, generally between sea level and 3000 feet. They are often machine harvested with the trees producing their first crop within two to three years. They produce a coffee with a harsher and stronger flavor, as well as a higher caffeine content. The Robustas are valuable in blends, and are used in solubles and extracts to provide a strong flavor punch for flavoring food products. They are also much more affordable than the Arabicas, although the Arabicas still constitute approximately 75- 80% of all coffee grown in the world.

Ingredients

  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons finely ground espresso coffee beans
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1 large egg white
  • 4 cups walnut halves (about 12 ounces)

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Spray large rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray. Whisk sugar and next 4 ingredients in small bowl. Whisk egg white in large bowl until frothy. Add walnuts; toss to coat. Sprinkle walnuts with espresso mixture and toss to coat. Spread coated walnuts on prepared sheet in single layer.
  • Bake 5 minutes. Slide spatula under walnuts to loosen from baking sheet and stir, rearranging in single layer. Bake until walnuts are dry to touch, about 5 minutes longer. Loosen walnuts from sheet again; cool on sheet

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) plus 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups (firmly packed) dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons instant espresso powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Whisk first 3 ingredients in medium bowl to blend.
  • Using electric mixer, beat butter and sugar in another medium bowl until blended, about 2 minutes. Add espresso powder and almond extract; beat 1 minute. Stir in flour mixture in 3 additions, mixing until just absorbed after each addition. Stir in chocolate chips and almonds (dough will be thick).
  • Turn dough out onto ungreased rimmed baking sheet. Using hands, press dough into 12-inch square. Pierce all over with fork at 1-inch intervals.
  • Bake until edges are lightly browned and beginning to crisp, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool on sheet 1 minute. Cut into 48 bars. Immediately transfer to rack; cool (bars will crisp as they cool). 

Original recipe from Bon Appetit. Can be made and saved for up to 5 days. Store in an air tight container.

Ingredients
1-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup brewed coffee
1-1/2 teaspoons instant coffee granules
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup prepared white frosting
24 chocolate-covered coffee beans
Directions
1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Line 12 cups in standard-size muffin pan with cupcake liners. In a bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, allspice, cinnamon and salt.
2. Beat butter and sugar in large bowl about 2 minutes or until light colored and smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. On low speed, add flour mixture, alternating with brewed coffee. Divide batter among prepared liners, 1/3 cup in each.
3. Bake at 350 degrees F for 25 minutes or until firm to the touch. Let cupcakes cool in pan on rack for 5 minutes. Remove from pan to rack and cool completely.
4. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine instant coffee, vanilla and 1 teaspoon warm water. Stir until coffee is dissolved. Stir in white frosting until blended and no dark streaks remain. Spread 1 heaping tablespoon over each cupcake. Decorate tops with coffee beans.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup HERSHEY’S Cocoa
  • Dash salt
  • 1/3 cup hot water
  • 4 cups (1 qt.) milk
  • 2 to 2-1/2 teaspoons instant coffee.
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

1. Stir together sugar, cocoa, instant coffee and salt in medium saucepan; stir in water. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Boil and stir 2 minutes. Add milk; stirring constantly, heat to serving temperature. Do Not Boil.
2 Remove from heat; add vanilla. Beat with rotary beater or whisk until foamy. Serve topped with marshmallows or whipped cream, if desired. Five 8-oz. servings.

Photograph from Gourmet.com

 

 

  • 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped
  • 3 cups semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, cut into bits
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 large eggs at room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons instant espresso powder
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • In a metal bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water melt the unsweetened chocolate, 1 1/2 cups of the chocolate chips, and the butter, stirring until the mixture is smooth, and remove the bowl from the heat. In a small bowl stir together the flour, the baking powder, and the salt. In a bowl beat the eggs with the sugar until the mixture is thick and pale and beat in the espresso powder and the vanilla. Fold the chocolate mixture into the egg mixture, fold in the flour mixture, and stir in the remaining 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips. Let the batter stand for 15 minutes. Drop the batter by heaping tablespoons onto baking sheets lined with parchment paper and bake the cookies in the middle of a preheated 350° F. oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until they are puffed and shiny and cracked on top. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets, transfer them to racks, and let them cool completely. Makes about 36 cookies.

With melted chocolate in the dough, a ton of chocolate chips, and a spot of espresso powder to play up the bittersweet nature of chocolate, this recipe could be the only one a chocolate lover ever needs. Original recipe & photograph from Gourmet.com

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 cups chilled whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons Irish whiskey
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder or instant coffee powder
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1/4 cup Baileys Original Irish Cream

Preparation

  • Stir sugar and 1/4 cup water in heavy medium saucepan over low heat until sugar dissolves. Increase heat and boil without stirring until syrup turns deep amber color, brushing down sides of pan with pastry brush dipped into water and swirling pan occasionally. Add 1/2 cup cream and 2 tablespoons butter (mixture will bubble vigorously) and stir until caramel melts. Continue boiling 2 minutes. Spoon 2 tablespoons caramel into small saucepan and set aside at room temperature. Stir whiskey into remaining caramel in saucepan. Pour into bowl.
  • Stir 2 tablespoons water and espresso powder in another small saucepan until espresso dissolves. Sprinkle gelatin over. Let stand 10 minutes to soften. Stir gelatin mixture over low heat until melted. Stir gelatin mixture into caramel in bowl. Place bowl over large bowl filled with ice and water. Let stand until caramel mixture is cool but not set, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes.
  • Using electric mixer, beat 1 1/2 cups cream in medium bowl to soft peaks. Fold 2 cups whipped cream into caramel mixture in bowl. Divide caramel mousse among 6 balloon-shaped wineglasses. Add Baileys to remaining whipped cream and continue beating until stiff. Spoon mixture into pastry bag fitted with star tip. Pipe atop mousse.

Let chill at least 3 hours. Can be made 1 day ahead. Original recipe& picture from Bon Appetit.

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